Best cycling routes around Atacama from San Pedro

  Cute little village, called San Pedro de Atacama, lies on a high plateau of Andes in the northern part of Chile. The area around creates the most outstanding landscape on the planet that includes deserts, volcanoes, geysers, hot springs and salt flats found only in this part of the world. Surroundings make the scenery around San Pedro to be worth seeing at least once in your life. Together with Easter Islands and Patagonia, stands as the top place to visit once in Chile. The area is known to be one of the driest places in the world which leads to the fact that there’s not much green around, yet the unique geology structure creates there something so beautiful that is beyond anything, anything I saw so far. Not even mentioning that you can also easily see a magnificent milk way at night too.

 Small town San Pedro, with population just under 4,000, tends to be a very popular destination, so it`s packed with hotels, hostels, restaurants, shops and anything travelers need really. Please be aware that beds are always in high demand, so you really have to book your stay in advance. I did not know about it, and I had to stay longer in Santiago to spend my new year there, not in San Pedro as planned. It happened because all was already booked up. I got there on 3.01.2016, and it was still full of tourists. Once you’re lucky claiming your accommodation, go to look around. Village is very small and feels very cosy. Whoever decided to name the streets wasn’t really in his clear mind, so you can get lost very easily at first, but after some time you will know your way around well. In the center you can have a good meal or just a nice coffee. You can buy some clothes, hats or a tasty local alcoholic drink, called pisco (actually Peruvians are a bit angry, as this drink has been made first by them…or so they say). The prices around main street are not so high, but clearly set for tourists. I have found a very cool little area to eat, in far east that travelers don’t know about (you’re welcome). Meals there cost around 4$, are very local and very tasty. There are a few small restaurants (if you can call it like that) next to each other, and every single one got something different to offer. There`s one internet cafe in the center too, if you needed, and broadband is really not as bad as backpackers complain about! Apart from that, main street is loaded with tourist agencies. You can book loads of amazing trips there at a very affordable price. Please note that you need some spare Chilean pesos with you, as there is always something extra to pay on your trip (usually entrance fee). It’s good to book few. However, for me, the highlight of my stay turns to be cycling around Atacama Desert. Except for 3 days tour I took around all lagoons, geysers and salars, but that was on Bolivian side, so I will write about it in section about that country.

  Cycling. You can hire a bike literally on every corner in San Pedro. They are in a very good condition, and you are getting an extra gear with them too (spare tube, helmet, pump and map). Prices are not so high, and they do depend on length of time you are planning to rent your bike for, and the quality of your vehicle. You can hire it from an hour up to 48 hours. Loads of hotels do this service too, which makes it easy to return it and just to go straight to your room after. I used one agency to rent and once my hotel, and prices were very similar. As far as I remember, it was around 6-8$ for the whole day. So, as I mentioned, you will be given a map with routes you can do. It really is easy to find your way around, but please keep your map with you, as you wont be meeting loads of people on the way to ask for directions. Take also loads of water with you. It’s a very hot area, and climate is extremely dry. Stuck up on some snacks too, shops are only in San Pedro! The field is elevated, so better to use sunglasses and sun protection cream. Now…AGAIN! I have lost all my photos from this beautiful place. I realized that while writing this blog. I was devastated, and I almost cried. I really captured such an amazing moments, areas, friends, and I took really great photos! This place is so so special for me. I have only few from my phone left. It is the same situation, I have had with my photos from Mexico and Belize when 2/3 of my pics just disappeared from my SD card, just like that. Did anyone got the same problem? Can I fix it? I still got all my SDs, and they are full, so photos are there, somehow. Help me readers, you’re my only hope!

Routs

  • Valley of the Moon

   Valley of the Moon, or Valley de la Luna, as a part of the Salt Mountain range, is one of the most visited places in San Pedro area.

The name, probably, came from the fact that the place really looks like from different planet. The whole plateau does! The valley is accessible from the town by car or bike. It is only 10 kilometers away, and you will get there via main road. There are loads of signs on the way pointing directions towards valley, so you will easily find your way. You could walk too, but the whole area of the valley is quiet large already, so you might get tired a bit. The valley also got a spot where you can do a sun-boarding. The entrance fee is just 3,000 Chilean pesos, that’s around 4.5$. The ground around is so dry that there are no any living creatures. So again, remember to take plenty of water with you. Well, as far as I remember, there is a little shop by the entrance too, in case you will run out of drinks. With your ticket you will get a map with all highlights on it, so even with no guide you wont miss anything. I don’t even want to start here how things are looking around there, because I know I already use word “amazing” way to often here. Basically, you will see few beautiful canyons, sandy desert, unusually structured rock formations, snow looks-like a ground (minerals under the soil are responsible for the white cover) and caves. Here, I have to say that after the earthquake in Nepal, I was a bit scared to go trough that tiny little dark caves, but I got over the fear while half way trough there. With the tour, you will end your trip watching the sunset over the amazing valley. So, as you know by now, I did book my tour to see the valley, but I also got there one day on a rented bike. Two ways of doing so got pluses. With tour you will go with a nice group and a tour guy. He will take you in some caves too. But while cycling there alone, you will be very flexible.

You will stop anywhere you like, and you will lose loads of calories, as there are loads of hills to climb. The big minus is that after the sunset its dark, and you will have to cycle back like that. The climate, like geological structure, is diverse too, so as soon as the sun is gone, it`s getting very very cold very very quickly. To be honest, sunset over the valley is something you can’t  miss. Well, anyway, you will decide! I guess it is worth doing it twice in both ways, if you have a spare time there. Why not to see the magnificent scenery twice.

  • Devils Throat

 Devils Throat is the name of a cycling path around another stunning valley. The entrance is just little bit further from Pukara de Quitor, on a right hand side. The trial is 18 kilometers long, so with the road back it`s 36. Every company, you will hire your bike from, will give you the map with the road on it. It is a very easy and pleasant path, a bit rocky at times, but mostly flat. Just in few places you will face some hills, but they are not so high at all. The land around is a bit green, with the little river that will accompany you trough the whole trail. You can see some houses on your way (watch out for angry guarding dogs :).

It really is amazing that people lives in such a peaceful and remote area. Just to warn you, that there will be no phone signal, so cycle carefully please. I did this trial with my lovely friend, I’ve  met on the top of Pukara de Quitor, Dorit. So anyway, because I was not alone, we let ourselves a bit, and we went way further than the Devils Throat trial. We crossed the river three times, holding our bikes in hands, and we got, probably, where not many tourists go. And really, again, watch your way around. I still have a big scar on my knee as a souvenir from there 😀 The whole experience was amazing, and the hills around your way will make you breathless. Me and my friend both had shoes and pants wet, but who cares. The area is so dry, nothing stays wet for too long. Dryer is definitely not needed for locals there.

  • Pukará de Quitor    

  So what stands behind this funny name? An archaeological site just north of the town. It is so close (3 km from San Pedro) that you can easily do it with Devils Throat in one day. The side is looking interesting even without the ruins. But they do add the ancient vibe to the area. It`s known that it has been structured by precolombian Atacameño people as a fortress against Inca people. The road there is very straight forward, and even I remember it by now, a year after. Just cross the river on the north-east area, to take the road along the bank of the stream. Then after some time, you should already see the signs pointing the direction. The entrance to the park is very affordable at just 3,000 CLP. You can find there also a small museum with some artifacts that have been found in the area, and a brief view of the history of the place and people who lived there and created it. There is also a place to lock your bike. The ruins are all over the little hill, you will hike. To be honest, it is not so spectacular as rest of the valley, but you can learn loads of interesting facts by reading all the descriptions. Once you’re done with it, please hike a bigger hill just next to it. At the top you will find a mirador (viewpoint), that will give you the opportunity to look at beautiful valley beneath. The road to the top, again, is not difficult, takes around 30 minutes, and its build of rocky steps. At the top you can find a little structure and some faces sculpted in the rock. They look pretty cool. When your eyes feel satisfy with the surrounded view, you can start heading back to San Pedro for a tasty lunch to satisfy your stomach now :p

Few days in vibrant Kathmandu

   It’s amazing how well I always knew what kind of areas in the world I would like to see in the future. Nepal was on my list as a very first country to visit since I was very young. Something was always telling me that it is probably one of the most fascinating and astonishing places in the world. What I wasn’t sure about was the wonder, if I will ever be able to go there. Fortunately, I did get a chance to visit this truly diverse land with the highest mountain range in the world. I wasn’t mistaken at all, as I found there everything, I always imagine I would find. Even that I was in Kathmandu during the earthquake didn’t change my experience in any way. I witness how Nepalese truly helped each other during and after the disaster. For this, and loads of other reasons, I consider Nepal as a small Asian country with the big-hearted people.

Landing in Kathmandu and getting around

  When it comes to the international airport, it is probably one of the oldest and smallest I’ve ever seen, but then the size makes it easier to find your way around. I arrived in April from not so warm Europe, so the heat struck me straight away. After 2 hours in the long queue to get a visa, I was finally able to see the other side. I picked my bag from the floor somewhere, and I left happy and glad it didn’t get missing. Stepping outside, I quickly spotted how overcrowded and chaotic this city is. This helped me to make a quick decision on not trying to work out how buses run, but just to take a taxi. The situation on the road can be really shocking for someone who has never been in Southeast Asia before. The jam, noise, unclear driving rules and no traffic lights makes you wonder how on earth Nepalese getting around on a daily basis there. The car or motorbike can drive everywhere where it fits, even through a tiny tiny streets, so better have your eyes around your head. Watch out also for what locals transport on their motorbikes or bikes, as It can be something four times of a vehicle size, so be aware of the situation around you to avoid being knock down by something. I wouldn’t recommend walking while listening to your music either to avoid any accidents. I would definitely suggest to get your accommodation in Thamel. It is the most touristic area in Kathmandu. I am always trying to stay away from this kind of places, but there is just way different. You can meet loads of amazing backpackers, trekkers, travelers and volunteers to talk to, to share your experience with. Locals are very friendly too, so you definitely won’t get bored or lonely there. Shops and restaurants are on every possible corner, but always have cash with you. It’s very unlikely to pay by card, maybe just in posh hotels and restaurants. Also if you will see a cash machine, use it. There’s not so many of them around. Some of them may not work and some may not accept your card. I’ve had a Visa and MasterCard, and I wasn’t always able to use the first one, but with the second I’ve had a better luck. 

Food

  Try to sample as many new things as you can. For me everything was very delicious and packed with wonderful flavors. It is a heaven for Asian cousin lovers, like myself. People who sell meals on the streets really mastered their cooking skills. They make it very local, very unique, always fresh, and usually made in front of you. I have to add that I’ve met few travelers that complained about experiencing some stomach problems after, but not me. So maybe try to find a golden line between cleanliness and vibe of authentic local street food. Momo`s are definitely must eat there. They are very traditional and you can have them with many different fillings and sauces.

I am from Poland, and they do remind me of our dish called pierogi. I wonder if that’s how they came to us through the Russia first.  Apart from them, rice and noodles are probably most popular. It’s like a fusion of Indian and Chinese food. They all come in good vegetarian range too. If you like a late meal you will get even a better choice, as loads of street stands are open only in the evening. It’s good to have a supper around that time, as you will meet loads of travelers around. The only problem there is lack of the streets light, so visibility depends only on shops and restaurants neons. It could be a problem sometimes, as often on some streets, I’ve had to walk in total darkness….alone…brrr.

Transport

  If there are loads of things you want to see in one day, hire a motorbike. It really is very cheap, around 10£ for a day, and can save you loads of time. You can get a bike too, but it can be difficult to ride it on all these small streets full of people. Otherwise, not much for me to say about public buses in capital, as I haven’t used it at all, relying just on my private transport – my legs. However, three main bus station are present with buses that connect cities and towns in Nepal. All a little bit chaotic, but by keep asking, you should eventually find the one you need. No worries if you will take a wrong one, everything is worth seeing in Nepal :D. More or less, Nepalese are good with English and always happy to help! First bus station (also called the Kathmandu Bus Terminal, or simply ‘new bus park’) is located at Ring Road, Balaju. It is basically for all long-distance buses, including the one to Pokhara and destinations in the Terai. Kantipath bus station (if you can call it like that, as buses are just parked on the side of the street) seems less confused (but still a bit!), and is located very close to the Thamel area on Tridevi Marg Kantipath, the main road running north-south at the junction where the Garden of Dreams is. There`s not so many buses leaving from there, so makes it easier to find your way around. I took my bus from there to Pokhara that leaves everyday around 7 am. You do not need to book in advance, but can be busy sometimes, so you may, just for the peace of your mind. This bus station is only in use early morning. Later in the day there is zero buses around. Green Line Bus station is a private company that provides better comfort at higher price. Usually they operate minivans with aircon and include a meal. Terminal can be found at Greenline bus park opposite the Garden of Dreams on the edge of Thamel.

  If you are looking for some trekking experience or any other trips, you can find all you need in Thamel that is packed with agencies. You can book your bungee jump, see some caves, discover the area around Kathmandu Valley, book a plane to see some of the 8000 high peaks. I did buy few, but they all been cancelled after the earthquake. Especially I am sad that I`ve missed a fly around the Himalayas. If you have a few spare days, go to see the Chitwan National Park, a World Heritage site since 1984. Its is a jungle with rich range of fauna and flora species, also a Bengali tiger. Loads of Nepalese, I’ve met, were pointing this wildlife area as a number one to see. You can stuck up on proper gear too there. If you like a good brand staff, they are a little bit cheaper in less touristic areas.

  For more about what to see in Kathmandu please click here, otherwise pack your back, book your fly, and off you go!

Convincing photos to choose an organized trip from San Pedro to Uyuni

   If you are still thinking whether you should cross the border between Chile and Bolivia yourself, please stop right now! Magnificent Salar de Uyuni is a must see place while in Bolivia or in northern part of the Chile. Tourists usually do visit this absolutely stunning and unique place from Uyuni, the town in Bolivia, or from San Pedro de Atacama in Chile. It is not so difficult to get to salt flats without any guide, but tour agencies, that can be found in many towns all around, came up with a wonderful 3 or 4 days tours that include Salar de Uyuni, as number one attraction, along with many more wonderful places that you can see only with a guide and by 4×4. Dry salty area, as a highlight, will become just like an addition next. Salar de Uyuni will get overshadowed by beautiful lagoons, geysers, deserts, volcanoes, truly remote villages, you will spend a night in (including a hotel made of salt), and interesting rock formations. It is one of the most bizarre and beautiful places in the world you just can not miss, especially while so close to it. Paying only 180$ (inc everything as accommodation, all meals, guide, 4×4 transport) for a 3 days tour is just a bargain we have to grab. Unluckily, I have lost loads of my photos from the trip, but I hope the remaining ones will be convincing enough for you to book this trip.

Backpacking South America, my route, total cost and few tips

It took me 4 months to save money and to plan my backpacking trip around South America. Being busy earning cash for my travel, I was also occupied thinking about packing, researching visas issues, planning my route and budget. It really is not so complicated, but it was my first backpacking trip in my life, and I did not have any friends that done it before, who could help me with some tips, to share some experience. I had to heavily rely on internet info and other blog posts to prepare. Yet, I still think there is not that much information about it. Here, I will share with you some knowledge about places I have visited, how I was getting from A to B, my budget, packing and some other tips.

Planning your route 

I have to admit that I am very proud of my path. I have visited all major attractions (like Iguazu Falls, Atacama Desert, Salar de Uyuni, Machu Picchu, Titicaca Lake, Dead Road), and I stayed in really amazing places. The only thing I haven’t seen was Angels Falls, as my plane from Bogotá to Caracas, in Venezuela, got cancelled, so I decided just to skip this one. Now, I am thinking that I shouldn’t. Venezuela is truly beautiful, and you can see Amazon from there as well. Basically, I did not plan my whole way around SA back home. I did only think that I will try to visit all countries on this continent, and I set major things I want to see, then I was building my expected way around these places. I think I did well at the end, as I saw 9 countries in total. I booked my hostels/hotels only in 3 first locations, and I planed my route only in the country I started from, Brazil. Then after everything was natural, I was planning my way on weekly basis, changing my mind from time to time. Everything turned out pretty well, and I do highly recommend to fallow my way, but not staying as long in Florianopolis, Santiago and Montanita, as you can add some extra locations to your trip, in Paraguay for example, or just adding Venezuela at the end. I think 6 days is an absolute maximum to stay in one place.

Please note, that real-life vikitravel can be found in every hostel`s kitchen, since there is loads of other backpackers to share their experience and recommend great places to see. Always worth listen and talking to them!

Brazil: Sao Paulo (3 nights) – Florianopolis (8 nights) – Foz do Iguaçu (4 nights) – Paraguay: Ciudad del Este (1 day) – Argentina: Buenos Aires (6 nights) – Uruguay: Colonia del Sacramento (1 day) – Argentina: Mendoza (2 nights) – Chile: Santiago (11 nights) – Valparaiso (1 day) – Vina del Mar (1 day) – San Pedro de Atacama (6 nights) – Bolivia: 3 days trip via desert from San Pedro to Uyuni – Uyuni (3 nights) – Potosi (6 nights) – Sucre (6 nights) – Cochabamba (3 nights) – La Paz (4 nights) – Copacabana (2 nights) – Peru: Puno (3 nights) – Cuzco (4 nights) – Aquas Qalientes, Machu Picchu ( 1 night) – Cuzco (2 nights) – Lima (3 nights) – Mancora (6 nights) – Ecuador: Guayaquil (1 night) – Montanita (10 nights) – Banos (4 nights) – Quito (3 nights) – Colombia: Cali (6 nights) – Bogota (7 nights).

Transport

I traveled around South America only by bus. Just once I used a ferry from Buenos Aires to Uruguay. There are loads of bus companies to choose from in every single country, offering different comfort (except in Bolivia) from normal to fully recline chairs with hot meals served onboard. Mostly possible to book online in advance, again, except Bolivia. Flying is very expensive and a bit pointless while backpacking. Train is an option too, especially now is getting more and more popular, but since I have not used it even once, I can not advise you on this service. I found this blog to be very useful for people who want to travel by train. For bus prices in each country you can have a look at my other post here. Regarding buses, they are very comfortable, except Bolivia (most amazing country anyway), and mostly affordable, except Argentina, Brazil and Chile.

I am afraid missing bags from the storage space under the bus are very common, thought nothing like that happened to me, other travelers, I have met, experienced it. There is nothing you can do about it, just hope that it wont happened to you. Always keep all valuable stuff in a small bag pack with you in the bus, try not to have expensive gear, clothes and shoes, not to miss it too much, just in case.

Border crossing

As a Polish nation, I do not need any visa for any country in South America. There is no fee to pay too, not even a tax (that you pay sometimes in Central America). That is for most of the European countries, even England, Germany and France. Border crossing was always nice and smooth for me, with no any hassle, trouble or any major issues. Actually, border personnel was always extra nice and very interested in me, probably due to the fact that not so many polish people travel in that part of the world. Blond hair and green eyes helped too, I guess. Just queuing for the stamp out/stamp in was annoying sometimes (especially at night). Please note that basic Spanish is essential, as they may ask where you are going to stay, or what is your occupation. It can be also a great time to eat, as there are always loads of food stands around to choose from (not between Mendoza, Argentina-Santiago, Chile). Bus driver always wait for everyone and count passengers to be sure all are in, before continuing journey, unless he doesn’t give a damn about it..nah joking, usually he does. Don`t try to smuggle anything, sniffing dogs are present at every border, and in Colombia, even on any route to stop the bus and search bags and passengers. Thought, I did not have any problems at the border, I’ve heard some stories from male travelers that were experiencing some problems, or being asked to pay a fee, that, of course, wasn’t required.

Budget

For the 4 months of traveling, excluding flying to this continent from Europe, I have spent approx 6.800$, that including everything, staying 70% of the time in hostels, rest in hotels, all the bus travel, food, trips, activities, tickets, parties, clothes, souvenirs…. Please keep checking fly4free website for cheap deals on flights to South America. I bought mine from Belgium to Sao Paulo in Brazil with return for 650$, but can get even cheaper than that. Here is my other blog post, where I look in to prices of each country with estimated daily budget.

Health insurance

Absolutely essential and one of the most important things before traveling. Can be easily purchase online, and is very affordable. You can buy it just day before your departure, and the price will be still the same. If you are not planning anything like surfing, winter-sports, just buy the cheapest one to cover medical bills. Otherwise, if you have some crazy plans, read what your insurance will cover, trust me, I am a lawyer. No point to buy an extra option for electronic losses (phones, tablets, laptops..etc), unless, of course, it is a very good and expensive policy. My friend had her staff covered, and after being theft from her expensive Nikon camera, got 35$ as of insurance for it! Medical cover is the most essential one for a backpacker. I bought mine for around 120$ for 6 months of my travel.

Safety

Just go. Safety is your last thing to worry about before backpacking. People are mostly travel alone now anyway, especially in South America. It is a very safe place, even for solo females, like myself. Just be intelligent and don’t act stupidly (walking alone at night, going out with strangers….etc).

Apps

Maps.me is the most important application. Please don’t take a fancy phone with you, unless you can afford losing it, but good smart phone that runs this app smoothly is essential. Old samsung s series are probably the best. I say it, as I was robbed in Chile, losing my camera, tablet and good glasses, so I experienced it myself. Coming back to maps.me, it is an application that allows you to store and later use maps without wifi. You will be even able to use navigation that will show you your location and directions (no wifi needed, as it runs on GPS). I have to say, I was impresses, as GPS was working for me even high in Bolivian mountains, just almost everywhere, and always in cities and town. Apart from street names, there are almost all hostels, hotels, shops, places of interest, all public offices (post office, police, etc). You gonna use it a lot, like I did. App is free of charge.

Other app I used was booking.com, but please note, booking in advance is more expensive than just good old way of turning at the hostel doors and checking in.

Flickr app is great too. It upload all your photos from your phone automatically (once connected to the internet, just turning the app on), so you are avoiding losing them with your phone. Free app again, but just need to create an account (that is free too).

Kindle/ebook/app to read ebooks is essential for every book lover, like myself.

Packing

Hmm, it is a very good question. I can just give you a few tips, I found to be useful during all my backpacking trips:

  • Less is more! First and most important. Do not take much with you, take half what you are planning in the first place. Clothes are very cheap in South America, especially in Bolivia and Colombia, and by buying them you are getting an amazing souvenir too. Something special in your wardrobe, trust me. I had an umbrella, but haven’t used it even once, so pointless to take. Shoes: funny story, as planning loads of hiking, especially in Bolivia and Peru, I bought and took very expensive Timberlands – throw them to the bin already in Brazil and was just wearing converse (for all my hiking, at the beach, on snow, salt, swamps, deserts….). 2 pairs are max to take.
  • Good light waterproof jacket and cover for backpack is a must. Here, I really love The North Face jackets, they just wont let you get wet!!
  • For girls: hairdryer is not needed, but you may want to use it in Bolivia sometimes, as of a cold temperature. Still, not worth taking it with you, there are always females around to borrow one, if needed.
  • Nova-days, we just can’t live without our smartphones, so it is very important to have an extension for the socket, as in many hostels they are far away from your bed.
  • Don`t try to save money buying a cheap backpack. It is one of the most important things and your home for next months. It will be on your back for many many hours, so very good, comfortable straps are essential. It really needs to be a top quality one. I bought a cheap one, had to sewn it many times, and I’ve had wounds on my shoulders from a very bad straps. Trust me, hurt a lot! Before my next backpacking trip I bought a good one and that made a big difference.
  • Apart from the shoes, I binned quickly, Lonely Planet book on South America got left in my third hotel, simply because I didn’t want to carry such a heavy guide-book, since everything I needed was online. Maybe for people staying in tents, when internet connection is not always available, might be helpful, but otherwise you will be just fine with your smart phone.

Injections

It is wildly required (according to an official info) to have a yellow fever injection and a proof of it! There are 5 more you may want to take. I did all of them, and I’ve had a little book to prove my yellow fever one. I read that you wont be able to enter without it (YF). However, in reality nobody checked it at the border…nobody, even once. But better to take them, just in case and for the peace of your mind.

Last tips

  • Please, wherever you are flying to, don`t stay just one night in your first location. Your body needs to rest after a long fly and adapt to the new climate. It took me 4 days when I landed in Brazil in November from a cold Europe.
  •  I`ve had 50 Euros always in my purse, just in case. Cash machine is not always available. US Dollars are good too.
  • When it comes to thieving and robberies, South America is a leader. Please, always keep an eye on your valuables. Do not keep your backpack behind, always on one arm on the side or on your chest. I was also tightening straps from the zip together.
  • Don`t drink a tab water anywhere, unless it’s confirmed by staff in hotel/hostel or by sigh close to the tap.
  • Planning to buy outstanding sweater, cardigan? Leave it for Bolivia and Peru! Best quality (especially alpaca`s wool) and price.
  • Try to, if possible, have two different types of your cards. I`ve had a Visa and MasterCard, and I found that sometime just first one worked, sometimes second. My MasterCard (credit card) was definitely more acceptable. 
  • Your passport and your wallet is your main priority! Never leave it alone, even in a locker in hostel! You don`t even realize how easy is to open it for professional. I got robbed this way in Santiago, in Chile.
  • Before departure, I gave my mother copy of my passport, insurance, injections I took, all pin numbers and account details, just in case and for peace of my mind. Please do so as well, leave it with someone you trust and memorize phone number, you newer know what might happen.
  • Take 2 types (thin and thick) of padlock. Some lockers got a thin holes (to use smaller one). Don`t worry if you will forget, they are widely available to purchase almost everywhere, along with socket extensions and adapters.
  • Do not panic if there is an error in a cash machine, it may not be your card, but machine might be just empty. It really is a common problem. I remember, in Buenos Aires, I’ve had to try 6 of them, before finding one with money in it.
  • As a budget backpacker, always check general prices in each country. You can have a look here too. A very expensive trip on Amazon trough a rain forest from Brazil might be very cheap from Bolivia, Colombia or Venezuela.

“Argentina has the waterfalls but Brazil has the balcony”. Choosing a gateway to see Iguazu Falls from Paraguay/Brazil/Argentina

  Wouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone, who visited South America or planning to, the fact that Iguazu Falls are the most known waterfalls on this continent. Going even further, one of the most impressive in the rest of the world, as they can easily and proudly be competitive with Niagara Falls. Having seen “Latino” one, I can confidently say that Iguazu stands out and outshines as way more incredible. They are taller than Canadian one, twice as wide, and are one of the greatest natural wonders of the world, with the area around marked as the UNESCO World Heritage. Iguazu Falls (Portuguese: Cataratas do Iguaçu, Spanish: Cataratas del Iguazú, Tupi: Y Ûasu “big water”) are situated near the border of Brazil, Paraguay and Argentina. Water falls of the Iguazu River that rises near the city of Curitiba, on the border of the Argentinian province of Misiones and the Brazilian state of Paraná. The river, for most of its course, flows through Brazil, however, most of the falls are on the Argentinian side. They creates a natural water border between these countries, and they are the largest waterfall system in the world (275 waterfalls). The falls divide the river into the upper and lower Iguazu. Below its confluence with the San Antonio River, that forms the boundary between Argentina and Brazil. Falls are set among National Parks, which consist of subtropical rain-forests that are home to hundreds of rare and endangered species of flora and fauna.

  The falls are very well known to every backpacker traveling through the continent or just around Brazil, Argentina or Paraguay, marking a very important dot on their map. There are two most popular gateways to discover these absolutely magnificent, violent and impressively big waters. First one is a Brazilian city called Foz do Iguaçu. Second, Argentinian town named Puerto Iguazú. Close by Ciudad del Este, in Paraguay, that is separated from Brazilian town just by the bridge named Puente de la Amistad (Friendship Bridge), creates also an easy way to reach our destination. I have seen all three of them, so If you’re in a rush and can pick just one location, you may want to have a look at some comparisons below. I will also write briefly about Argentinian and Brazilian side of the waterfalls to help you pick one, if you can not see both, which in my opinion is ideal, but not always a case for everyone.

Iguazu falls from Brazilian side

  • Three possible ways to experience the falls: from the top (but only from the side), from the bottom (Devil’s Throat, please take a waterproof jacket!) and by boat.
  • You can book a helicopter ride (only available on the Brazilian side) that cost around 100$.
  • This side offers a bus service connecting the falls with other activities. That service runs from the entrance to the end of the park every 10 minutes in both directions.
  • You’ll get to see the entire panorama of cascades, and this view cannot be duplicated on the Argentinian side.
  • Better Viewpoints, but really only a couple different of them.
  • Really cool bird park just outside the gates of the Brazilian National Park entrance.
  • As of a smaller area of the park, can be done in half of the day.
  • Entrance ticket is cheaper.

Iguazu falls from Argentinian side

  • Iguazú National Park is much bigger than its Brazilian counterpart, with more trails to walk along, and some that lead you right into the open water. You’ll need at least a full day (or two) to see it all and walk all of its trails.
  • Boat trips available too.
  • The Garganta del Diablo, bridge above the falls, literally swallows you up as you walk towards the end. It is probably the most impressive viewpoint where you appreciate the absolute power of the falls. The bridge extends all the way to the edge of the falls, as tons of water plunge aggressively into the far distance.
  • Available zip line.
  • You can get right on top of the waterfall, not exactly possible on Brazilian side.
  • On the Argentinian side of the park, there’s a small train leaving about every half an hour from near the entrance, going all the way to the beginning of the trail to the Garganta del Diablo.
  • There are many more options on the Argentinian side, and that is the side where you would want to spend more time.
  • 20% falling on to the Brazilian side and an impressive 80% in Argentina

The biggest difference, in my opinion, between Argentina and Brazil was that in Argentina you can see falls from right of the top, giving you the impression of standing on them. In Brazil, however, you have the impression of standing kind of under the waterfalls. Two totally different thing that are possible only on each side. Very difficult to compare.

Foz do Iguaçu (city in Brazil)

Pluses

  • Foz do Iguaçu is a city, and that gives you the opportunity to stuck up on anything you may be missing.
  • The prices around are not to high, and probably close by Ciudad del Este participate in this fact too.
  • There are few big discount shops around for a budget backpackers. Cheap street food stand can be easily found all around.
  • Bus, that goes to the falls, is located in the city center, very close to the big bus station.
  • Zoo to visit.
  • More hotels, restaurants and other amenities.
  • Not as touristic as Puerto Iguazú.

Minuses

  • Foz do Iguaçu is probably the worst city, I have stayed in while traveling around South America.
  • Main bus station, that connect cities (arriving from Florianopolis for example), is located far away from the center, which makes it difficult to just walk to your accommodation
  • Not many things to do around.
  • Not the friendliest people, I have met.

Puerto Iguazú (town in Argentina)

Pluses

  • Pleasant, safe, quiet and cute little town, so It is easy to find your way around.
  • Closest to Argentinian side of the falls.
  • Loads of travelers around to meet.
  • People seems more friendly than on Brazilian side.

Minuses

  • Very expensive prices, as generally in Argentina.
  • Not many cash machines around, and some do not accept your cards.
  • Nothing really to do in the town.
  • Expensive restaurants, set for tourists.

Ciudad del Este (city in Paraguay)

Pluses

  • Very cheap to stay in, eat out, everything really.
  • Easy access to Foz do Iguaçu, just by crossing the bridge from where you can catch a bus to the falls. Taxi is cheap to take too.
  • Very crowded streets, full of trading locals which give you the opportunity to discover the daily life and environment around Paraguayan people that live there.
  • Experiencing amazing, very lively vibrant city, a bit of a smuggling one, with busy streets packed with loads of stands. Well known for its cheap electronic equipment.
  • Markets rich of fruits and vegetables at very low prices.
  • Loads of cheap street food stands where you can grab a lunch for as little as 1$.
  • Extremely cheap accommodation.
  • Atmosphere on the streets.
  • Least touristic one on our list.
  • Very friendly people, very chatty, helpful, easy to interact with, more open to travelers.
  • Definitely one of my favorite places in South America.

Minuses

  • The only minus, I found, is an extra time you need to get to Foz de Iguazu to catch a bus to the falls. Having said that, you can get a taxi at a very cheap price to take you to the bus stop in Brazil.

Verdict

Of course, I will leave the choice to you. However, if I had to visit it not having much time, I would stop in Paraguay (Ciudad del Este), and from there I would travel to the Argentinian side to see it. For whats it worth, whatever side you will pick, you will be blown away by the magnificent diverse nature of the area and the beauty of this violently falling waters.

Extra shot of adrenaline at the Dead Road in Bolivia

Name “Dead Road” definitely does not come in a first place to any mind as a casual attraction. Originally named Yungas Road became well-known as a silent killer of thousands. Famous for being most dangerous road in the world that contributed to many deaths of drivers in the past and some cyclists in recent years. All as a result of how and where the road has been constructed. A combination of a single track road, 900m high cliffs, rainy weather, limited visibility, rockfalls, waterfalls and lack of guardrails participated in all death. Luckily, and finally, Yungas road was modernised to include two driving lanes, asphalt pavement, drainage systems and guardrails. New road has been opened in 2009, as an alternative of a must choice, replacing the dangerous 64 km stretch. All traffic being diverted to the new road. I am really glad motorists can now travel from La Paz to Coroico without fearing the journey may be their last. New road, apart from the fact that has already saved hundreds of life, left Bolivia also with one of the coolest, adrenaline giving and very adventurous tourist attraction in this country. People from all around the world visit this part of Bolivia to cycle down trough the original way. I did too.ddfdfdfd

Some statistics to give you the idea

“200 to 300 estimated death drivers yearly along Yungas Road and as late as 1994 there were cars falling over the edge at a rate of one every two weeks.”

“One of Bolivia’s most tragic road accidents happened on July 24th 1983 when an overcrowded bus veered off the side of the road and into a canyon killing more than 100 passengers.”

“Even with these improved conditions, Yungas Road shows no mercy. Nowadays, the death toll is limited to local workers and daredevil backpackers still using the infamous road. It is believed that more than 22 cyclists have lost their lives on Bolivia’s “Death Road” since 1998.”20160202_101011

To do or not to do

The answer for me is definitely YES TO DO. I wasn’t thinking even for a minute whether I should do it or not. It was definitely one of the coolest thing I did in South America. However, it really is not for everyone. Most agencies will not be very honest with you, as they just want loads of people to sign for it for the profit. There is no limit of age, fitness etc, but since I have done it, I can set some average requirements. Here they are:

  • Dead Road is suitable from very confident cyclists to, of course, experts. A bit higher than average fitness and above. In particular for everyone above 16, but mostly done by younger group of people, usually at the age gap of 20-30. I did have two people at the age of 50-60 in my group. They both were fit and did well. Having said that, our group was one of the fastest, starting last, finishing first, so I am sure it can be done by not perfectly fit people, but maybe get some advice on best company to go with, if that’s the case for you.
  • Most of the road is very stony and dusty. The whole road is 64 km long, and, thought, you mostly going downhill, you have to be a confident cyclist with some experience to keep up with the group.
  • You have to be very very careful, you need a perfect eyesight. The whole road is mostly thin and going via many waterfalls. Mentioning good eyesight meant to warn you that at the beginning road is extremely foggy, and it is difficult to navigate. Waterfalls are very tricky, as the group do not stop to pass them, you will go trough them at your max speed.20160202_122240
  • Keep in your mind that it is pretty much “fast and furious” activity. You do not have a choice, but just go at max speed, well…at least my group was fast. So think twice if you want to do this. Trust me, I felt on my head, destroying the helmet, having an open wound on my left elbow, that got swollen as well. Yet, I still had 30 kilometers to go….gosh that was painful. Another guy broke his leg too.
  • Cycling will last 5 hours, at high performance. Road is approximate downhill: 90% (one section contains a few small uphills). You have to be ready for sore hands.
  • The drop in altitude means travelers experience both chilly conditions in the Altiplano highlands and hot humid conditions in the rain-forests below. Your body needs to be ready for it. Highly not recommended for people, that already feeling light-headed at the high of 2000m.

Once the answer is yes

  • Even that you will be provided with food and water, take an extra bottle with you. You will start in very cold environment, but once half way trough, you will be surrounded by tropical hot weather, and that`s the time when your body will need some extra hydration, so you will drink loads at the end.
  • Take a good waterproof jacket, as is usually raining near the top.
  • As the temperature will be going up, proportionally to the distance cycled downhill, have something under to wear after, preferably with long sleeve, unless you will be provided with elbow protection.20160202_094517
  • Take maybe old cloths. I thrown away my shoes after.
  • Have some wet tissues, your face will be constantly covered with mud.
  • Lucky you if you own GoPro, you can record the whole way by attaching your camera to the bike or helmet. Few of my group-mated done it.
  • Do not book you trip if you just landed in La Paz. You body needs few day to adapt to the altitude. Yungas Road climbs to around 4,650 meters, from where you will start.
  • Check the weather for the next day. No worries, you can book a trip just one day before, even before 17.00 pm. The bottom line is not to rain that day!
  • Have a phone in your pocket. Thought you will have just quick breaks, you will have few chances to take some photos of this absolutely outstanding landscape and scenery.
  • Remember! 21 cyclists and 5 guides have died since the road had been opened for mountain bike trips. It might not be the most dangerous road in the world anymore, but it is still the Death Road. Don`t be to cocky on the road.
  • Most likely your agency will not cover the entrance fee for riding a bike. it is 50 Bs now – 25 Bs at the start and 25 Bs at the end of the road.
  • You really should be covered with medical insurance for this!20160202_122003

Prices and booking

Dead Road is usually done from La Paz, the city in Bolivia. There are loads of agencies to provide you with their service, especially around city center area. Every single hostel and most hotels can book you in too. It really isn’t a problem to buy this trip. It is relatively cheap. Prices depend on agency and mostly the kind of the bike, you will be provided with. It will be between 50-100$, as of 2016. I rented the worst bike, and I think being cheap about the bicycle is not the best idea. Get a double suspension one and from a good agency. Never go with Luna Tours agency (see photos above to recognise uniform and logo). I went with them and was promised to be provided with photos and movies of us while cycling. They did film a lot, took loads of photos, and at the end agency provided us with CDs where all media suppose to be. After few moths, when I came back home exited to show movies to my sister and her kids (to show how cool is their aunt), I discovered that there is no photos or movies of us!!!  Just old movies to promote agency. I was extremely disappointed and angry, I have only few photos from my phone. DSC_0830.jpg

Brief overlook of the day trip to do the Dead Road

  • My meeting point was at the cafe in La Paz at 7.00 am where we had a breakfast, and we briefly discussed the plan for the next 10 hours. Please note that some agencies can pick you from the hotel.fdf.jpg
  • At 8.00 am our bikes got uploaded to the top of the van, we sat in, and we went off from La Paz, which is at a height of 3,600 meters (11,810 feet), to the foot of the Andes Mountains towards the summit, which was at 4,700 m.
  • Approx at 10.00 am we arrived at the starting point of La Cumbre Pass. We then proceed to get the specialized equipment for each of us. The guides make recognition of our teams. We were also explained of all the rules at the road, how to sign with your hand, and what our schedule will be.
  • We were fitted into our gear that was: a jacket, pants with knee pads to put under, gloves, and a full-face helmet. Then we tested our mountain bikes: breaks and sit high. Our guide rechecked all again to make sure all is safe, and we went off.
  • Starting the adventure at around 11.00 am.
  • First 20 kilometers is via new asphalt road to Coroico. Actual Dead Road will start after that length. In this bit we can get used to the bikes and enjoy the road before difficult part.
  • Quick break for a snack before getting in to actual Yungas Road.
  • Dirt road begins at a height of 2,700 meters (2,953 feet) above sea level. In the beginning of the Bolivian jungle. Exactly where the paved road ends begins the most dangerous road in the world.
  • Keep cycling through rivers, waterfalls, along with the wide variety of beautiful flora and fauna with few breaks to keep the team together.
  • At 15.00 finishing and arriving at the bridge, congratulating each other. At the end of the road, you will get a well deserved beer or coke and a t-shirt. I picked coke…hmmm, I must have being still in shock after my fall :D.
  • After a little rest heading off for a well deserved dinner with swimming pool on the side and showers to refresh.
  • At approx 16.30-17.00 heading back to La Paz, arriving at around 18.30-19.00.

Funny things we have learned from backpacking

  • It really is possible to wash all your underwear everyday even for six months.
  • Hostel kitchen is better than tripadvisor.
  • You are happy changing location so quickly, so people don’t see that you wear same clothes ever so often.
  • Nobody likes upper bed on a bunk-bed.
  • Poorer you get, better chef you become.
  • Calling you a tourist is like the worst curse.
  • You drink and smoke too much.
  • Your brain switched to “cheaper food taste better”.
  • Your sense of smell is not so sharp anymore.
  • You felt in love with hammocks and suddenly it is your favorite furniture.
  • You are planning a second trip, before finishing the first one.
  • You haven`t had that many bruises since childhood.
  • You don’t mind chickens in the bus for 8 hours.
  • You have a high tolerance to the noise.
  • Your style is called “comfortable”.
  • It is a leisure to change your socks everyday.
  • Your not the only one on limited daily budget.
  • You can make a friend in 5 minutes, you can lose a friend in 3.
  • Available TV is like top pleasure, doesn’t matter you don`t understand the language.
  • WiFi is more often available than hot water.
  • People actually like you.
  • You love locals with all your heart, but you still have to guard your back pack like everyone is a potential theft.
  • Police is cool.
  • You will walk 10 kilometers to the hostel, but never skip a party.
  • Beer is good only in Europe.
  • Your not as good in negotiation as you thought you are.
  • You rarely may tip, but not as much.
  • You think you are so important, because you leave a feedback on booking.com.
  • You know there is a female in your room, because she dries her panties on the side of the bed, like you (female) do.
  • You know there is a male in your room, because he doesn’t dry his underwear on the side of the bed like you (female) do.
  • You prefer to go out in the evening, than eat the next day.
  • Every breakfast equal toast.
  • You think you are cooler than any tourist.

Buenos Aires-Uruguay by ferry

 It would be a crime not to pop in to any of Uruguayan cites or towns while in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Especially if you will fallow my way of thinking: “common, you may not have this occasion in your life again”. Visiting close by Uruguay is well easy and well possible, but that, of course, if you have some spare time. There are few available options of transportation to get there from Buenos Aires. Apart from the bus, that can take you everywhere in South America, you can fly (very expensive and a bit pointless) or just take a ferry. Here, we will look in to the last mentioned option, simply because I used it for my one day trip to Uruguay, to Colonia del Sacramento specifically. Ferry, apart from being nice option for a trip, can be a great way to move to your next location while travelling around South America. I guess buses are the cheapest option, and there is loads of info about timetables and prices online, so I will just concentrate on the water-path. The ship, as a way quicker option than bus, can be also a great break from bus traveling, as if you are backpacking, like I did, you will be spending loads of time in them, I mean looooads.

 So basically, you can choose between two kind of trips (places) you can reach by ferry. First one will take you all the way to Montevideo, capital of Uruguay. Second, to Colonia del Sacramento, a cute, quiet and small colonial town by the cost. As stated before, I took a trip to Colonia, but definitely would pick Montevideo over now. You can also see both, if you have time of course, as from Colonia you can catch a bus to capital that takes just 3 hours of journey. Please note that these companies do operate between other towns and cities, but Montevideo and Colonia are, in my opinion, best one to see.

Companies, service and routes

 The Buenos Aires – Montevideo or Colonia del Sacramento ferry route is currently operated by 3 companies. The Buquebus service runs up to 13 times per week, while the Colonia Express service runs up to 3 times per day. The Seacat company is the third option to choose from.

Buquebus provides two services to Colonia del Sacramento – one faster and more expensive, and the other is slower and therefore cheaper. The faster Buquebus catamaran ferry (1h15mins) is usually quite crowded with day tours and travel groups.IMG_2588 Cheaper prices are well possible to find when booking in advance and online. The fast boats have a free wireless internet. The slower boat takes about 3 hours, and it is the one I took. However, checking now the web page, I can no longer find this service. Shame, I really loved my 3 hours on the endless sea. Both kind of boats have a restaurant, cafe and an off duty shops. Buenos Aires to Montevideo service takes 2h15mins and arrives at the Ciudad Vieja district of Montevideo, situated very close to the downtown. Terminal (dock) is located at Antártida Argentina 821, Puerto Madero, Buenos Aires (same as for Seacat).

Colonia Express takes roughly 1h to reach Colonia and 3h45mins to reach Montevideo. There is no wifi provided, but there is a duty-free shop and a small bar selling snacks and coffees. Terminal (dock) is located at Av. Elvira Rawson de Dellepiane 155, Puerto Madero Sur, Buenos Aires.

Seacat ferry to Montevideo takes 4h15mins, to Colonia – 1h. Termina is located at Antártida Argentina 821, Puerto Madero, Buenos Aires (same as for Buquebus).

Prices as of July 2017

Busquebus (webside here) is the most expensive and offers one way economy class ticket to Montevideo from 93$. However, return ticket starts at 43$ (can’t believe I picked this company!). Day trip to Colonia cost around 80$ (same day return) economy class fast 1h15min boat, which doesn’t seems like a great discount, as a single journey starts from 47$.

Colonia Express (website here) offers a day trips (with return the same day) to Colonia that cost from 70$ (the cheapest) up to 115$, depending on time and day. One way to Colonia cost around 38$ in the cheapest economy class. To Montevideo, one way ticket cost around 45$ in the cheapest economy class.

Seacat (webside here) day trip to Colonia (return the same day) ferry cost from 75$ (economy), and it seem to be a steady price. Buenos Aires-Montevideo cost 43$ for one way cheapest economy class.

Buying a ticket

  It is not necessary to pre-book your ticket online, but it can save you some money, and it is a good idea during a holiday when loads of people travel on this route. Buying in advance can also save you some stress, as there might be a long queue to get a ticket just before the departure. As mentioned, you can purchase your ticket online, thought the web page for Busquebus is very poorly designed with a very misleading currencies in dollars. However, if you are not in Buenos Aires, it is best to book and buy online before the departure. My hostel was very close to the Busquebus terminal, so I just walked there, and I bought a ticket at the agent located inside. I can’t say stuff speaks well English, but we closed the deal without any major hassle. You can pay by cash or card, and as far as I remember, I purchased a day return the cheapest option to Colonia (3h of journey each way) and I paid around 70-80$ in total (December 2015).

Remember to check-in

  Please do remember that this is an international journey that required you to check-in at the doc with your passport and bag, if you have one. Same as at the airport, you will have to get in a queue lane towards your check-in desk. You should also be at the terminal at least an hour and a half before the departure for immigration purposes etc. Your passport will be checked, but you will get stamped after check-in, but before waiting area. I can’t remember seeing off duty shops there, but they are at the ferry, with a very good prices, especially for cosmetics. Liquor is also available to purchase.

Time change

 Please do keep in you mind that a time difference between Uruguay and Argentina, with Uruguay being ahead, is one hour. Important to know the proper return departure time. I wasn`t aware of it, and I arrived at the dock an hour ahead, when I could enjoy the Colonial old town longer.

Last tips

  • Argentinian pesos are widely used in Colonia. I paid in the restaurant by them for my bill.
  • Very cute touristic old town in Colonia by the cost is easily accessible just on food, so no need to take a taxi.
  • For a budget backpacker is better to get your own food and take with, as restaurants in Uruguay are very expensive, with pizzas and burgers starting at 10$, as the cheapest option. You can get a snack with you for the time of journey too, as again, restaurant inside the ferry is very pricey and, to be honest, not the best one.
  • 3-4 hours is more than enough to visit Colonia del Sacramento.
  • If you plan to pick Montevideo over Colonia del Sacramento, which I really think is a better option, you need to stay a minimum of one night in capital to do a proper city-seeing, unless going very early, returning with the last service.

  • Please consider buying a ticket in advance for weekends and the peak season (Christmas until the end of February).

Say hello to my little friend

  Learning salsa, visiting places, meeting new people, chatting with locals, enjoying night life. My time in Colombia was definitely beyond my expectations and came as a highlight. I just wish I could have more time to spend there. As just of my 12 days slot before flying to Panama, I could only see Cali and Bogotá. Sadly, I had to skip Medellin, the city I always wanted to visit. However, I`ve had enough time to absolutely fall in love with locals. They charmed me with their kindness, passion for dance, music and general love for life. Thought, Latino are well known for being very enthusiastic about dance and music, yet they still managed to surprised me how much they really do love it, and how important it is in their lives. And here we are in Cali, the city where salsa is coming from. Walking around, high on a coffee, I was able to truly discover this, once one of the most dangerous in the world, city. I saw people enjoying their life, dancing on the streets, being always surrounded by the music that could be heard from cars, houses, phones, cd players, literally from every corner. You really have to try hard to find a quiet place there. So many things happen always around, leisure areas are usually full of people. This can be hardly found in busy western countries that seems so grey next to colourful and vibrant Colombia. I met loads of local friends there along with other travellers. Not surprisingly, they all said that Colombia was one of the best destinations of their backpacking trips. I am just hoping, I will go back to to this country. There is still so much to experience and discover for me. Hopefully one day…

My highlights

  • Enjoying live events in Parque Artesanal Loma de la Cruz.
  • Watching Colombians dance salsa on the street.
  • Lunch in mercado with just locals.
  • Late night in Salsa Club, where I learned to dance it.
  • Starting every morning with the best coffee in the world.
  • Chilling on the hill around San Antonio Church.
  • Enjoying rice and beans almost as good as in Brazil.
  • Hanging out with Manu Chao crew, as they stayed in my hotel during his tour.
  • Few scary night walks back to hotel.
  • White rum with Russian version of Jack Sparrow (hello Anton;).
  • Sweet bamboo juice.
  • Making loads of amazing friends.